Southern California Photography by Alan Pavlik, editor and publisher of Just Above Sunset
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Photos and text, unless otherwise noted, Copyright 2006 - Alan M. Pavlik

If you use any of these photos for commercial purposes I assume you'll discuss that with me

These were shot with a Nikon D70 - using lens (1) AF-S Nikkor 18-70 mm 1:35-4.5G ED, or (2) AF Nikkor 70-300mm telephoto, or after 5 June 2006, (3) AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor, 55-200 mm f/4-5.6G ED. They were modified for web posting using Adobe Photoshop 7.0

The original large-format raw files are available upon request.

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Visitors from February 28, 2006, 10:00 am Pacific Time to date -


Sunday, 5 November 2006
Fall in Georgia
Topic: Guest Photography
Fall in Georgia
Matching Georgia Porches, our friend from the South sends more photographs.

"The register maple in my front yard may be the brightest tree in the neighborhood. It is affected drastically by the angles of the afternoon sun. In the first shot you can see the difference in chromosomes between the sugar maple limb in the foreground and the register maple." - Phillip Raines

Georgia maples

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia maples

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia maples

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos Copyright © 2006 - Phillip Raines

What is a register maple? Where does it fit?

Maple Species Native to the United States
Species
Common Name
Species
Scientific Name
General Geographic Distribution
Sugar Maple Acer saccharum Northeast United States and Southern Canada
Black Maple Acer nigrum Northeast United States and Southeast Canada
Red Maple Acer rubrum Eastern United States and Southeast Canada
Silver Maple Acer saccharinum Eastern United States and Southeast Canada
Boxelder Acer negundo Eastern and Central United States and Canada
Mountain Maple Acer spicatum Northeast United States and Southeast Canada
Striped Maple Acer pensylvanicum Northeast United States and Southeast Canada
Bigleaf Maple Acer macrophyllum Pacific Coast United States and Canada
Chalk Maple Acer leucoderme Southeast United States
Canyon Maple Acer grandidentatum U.S. Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountain Maple Acer glabrum Western United States
Vine Maple Acer circinatum Pacific Coast of United States and Canada
Florida Maple Acer barbatum Southeast United States Coastal Plain and Piedmont


Posted by Alan at 6:58 PM PST | Post Comment | Permalink
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Updated: Sunday, 5 November 2006 7:10 PM PST
Friday, 3 November 2006
Not Just Paris - Another Russian Submarine
Topic: Oddities
Not Just Paris - Another Russian Submarine
Russian Attack Submarine Scorpion b-427, on display in Long Beach, California - aft torpedo roomIn last weekend's Just Above Sunset, Our Man in Paris, Ric Erickson, editor of MetropoleParis, told us of the odd Russian submarine in the middle of Paris, with pictures and everything. It was just sitting in the round pond at the Tuileries gardens - really.

Every major city should have a Russian submarine. In Long Beach, docked next to the actual Queen Mary, there's our Russian submarine - Russian Attack Submarine 'Scorpion' b-427 - and it's real too (to the right, the aft torpedo room) -
  • Russian Designator: Project 641
  • NATO Designator: Foxtrot-Class
  • Manufacturer's Number: b-427
  • Built: 1972
  • Decommissioned: 1994
  • Length: 299 feet, 6 inches
  • Beam: 24 feet, 7 inches
  • Draft: 20 feet
  • Displacement: 1,952 tons surfaced, 2,475 tons submerged
  • Built: Sudomekh Shipyard, Leningrad
  • Construction: 3/8 inch outer light hull comprising ballast tanks. 7/8 inch QT28 Nickel Steel pressure hull.
  • Complement: 12 officers, 10 midshipmen, 56 seamen
  • Maximum Diving Depth: 985 feet
  • Speed: 16 knots surfaced, 15 knots submerged, 9 knots snorkeling
  • Range: 20,000 miles surfaced at 8 knots 11,000 miles snorkeling 380 miles submerged at 2 knots
  • Endurance: 3 - 5 days submerged
  • Propulsion: 3 x Kolomna 2D42M diesel engines, 2,000 hp each. 3 x electric motors; 2 with 1,350 hp and 1 with 2,700 hp. 1 x auxiliary motor with 180 hp. 3 x propeller shafts, each with 6 bladed propellers.
  • Torpedoes: 22 maximum
  • Radar: Surface search: Snoop Tray; I band.
  • Sonar: Herkules medium-frequency active/passive. Feniks passive search/attack.

Click on the link for more information on our sub. You'll find a full photo tour in this weekend's Just Above Sunset, which should be online Sunday morning.

Russian Attack Submarine Scorpion b-427, on display in Long Beach, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russian Attack Submarine Scorpion b-427, on display in Long Beach, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Beach, through the sub's periscope -

Russian Attack Submarine Scorpion b-427, on display in Long Beach, California - view through periscope


Posted by Alan at 7:34 PM PST | Post Comment | Permalink
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Updated: Friday, 3 November 2006 7:36 PM PST
Thursday, 2 November 2006
Baroque Blooms
Topic: Botanical Studies
Baroque Blooms
Thursday, November 2 - long light with good shadows is the only hint of winter on the way out here. It was in the mid-seventies by noon, with a light breeze off the Pacific and pretty much full sun. And things are still in bloom. These, the spotted calla lillies, in back end of Beverly Hills with all the twenty bedroom mansions and such, where the big stars and studio heads live. The rose was in the Mount Olympus area - garish and new ten million dollar modern homes with columns and fountains (the Greek thing) in the hills between Laurel and Nichols Canyon, floating high above Hollywood Boulevard. This is November out here.

Early November bloom, Los Angeles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early November bloom, Los Angeles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Early November bloom, Los Angeles


Posted by Alan at 6:57 PM PST | Post Comment | Permalink
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Wednesday, 1 November 2006
Architectural Note: Different Times
Topic: Architectural Notes
Architectural Note: Different Times

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Station Ten on Hawthorn Avenue, HollywoodThings were different in the thirties. The Great Depression had everyone turning to the government to help them survive. And the government responded with public works projects - the WPA and all. That meant roads, dams, all sorts of public buildings. If the economy was in the weeds, you could put people to work building things. Building out the infrastructure would do nicely. And it worked - people had jobs and the nation got what was needed to move the country dramatically forward.

The public buildings that went up at the time reflected the "we're all in this together" ethos in their Moderne style, and "the government is good" detailing. And they pointed toward a better future. Neoclassicism, Gothic, Arts and Crafts and Baroque all pointed backward to an earlier age, some romanticized vision of a more comforting past - and there was much of that built out here in Hollywood. That's what much of the movie industry was about. You see it in the elaborate movie palaces. But with the public works buildings there was no looking backward.

There's an example hidden in the middle of Hollywood - the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Station Ten on Hawthorn Avenue, a tiny side street just southeast of the Hollywood and Highland complex with its new Kodak Theater for the Oscars. It's an anonymous classic from a time long ago, now entirely out of place - no glitz, no nostalgia, nothing sly and clever, and certainly no cynicism about the future.

Things were different then.

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Station Ten on Hawthorn Avenue, Hollywood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Station Ten on Hawthorn Avenue, Hollywood


Posted by Alan at 4:48 PM PST | Post Comment | Permalink
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Updated: Wednesday, 1 November 2006 4:49 PM PST
Tuesday, 31 October 2006
Georgia Porches - Halloween in the South
Topic: Guest Photography
Georgia Porches - Halloween in the South
Two contributors to these pages, Phillips Raines and Rick, the News Guy, are in the Deep South, or, since we're talking the Atlanta area, that may be the New South. The photos below are from Phillips Raines, the writer, master mason and professional musician. You can put those in any order you wish. He's a master at all three, and a photographer. Here are Georgia porches, this Halloween.

"This house has pumpkins on the gable of an arched lattice porch. The sinister cats were props at a Kiss concert but have been put to work every Halloween for at least a decade. Usually little children must wait to trick or treat here because the cats are just too scary." - PR

Georgia porch, Halloween 2006 - This house has pumpkins on the gable of an arched lattice porch.  The sinister cats were props at a Kiss concert but have been put to work every Halloween for at least a decade. Usually little children must wait to trick or treat here because the cats are just too scary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The front porch of Rick, the News Guy, as Phillip notes, most likely decorated by his wife, the CNN executive - "Note the balance of caution tape and spider webs juxtaposed by the architecture." There is, however, no scary Wolf Blitzer.

Georgia porch, Halloween 2006 - the CNN folks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A masonry note - "Behind a cats cradle of wires this two story porch rest beneath one of my chimneys built for a neighbor just a few doors up the street."

Phillip Raines - custom chimney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip Raines - custom chimney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos and comments, Copyright © 2006 - Phillip Raines

Items by Phillip Raines in Just Above Sunset - Phillip Raines' comments on current events can be found scattered throughout Just Above Sunset and the web logs by using the recently revised search function.


Posted by Alan at 5:19 PM PST | Post Comment | Permalink
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Updated: Tuesday, 31 October 2006 5:21 PM PST

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