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Southern California Photography by Alan Pavlik, editor and publisher of Just Above Sunset
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Photos and text, unless otherwise noted, Copyright 2006 - Alan M. Pavlik

If you use any of these photos for commercial purposes I assume you'll discuss that with me

These were shot with a Nikon D70 - using lens (1) AF-S Nikkor 18-70 mm 1:35-4.5G ED, or (2) AF Nikkor 70-300mm telephoto, or after 5 June 2006, (3) AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor, 55-200 mm f/4-5.6G ED. They were modified for web posting using Adobe Photoshop 7.0

The original large-format raw files are available upon request.

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Visitors from February 28, 2006, 10:00 am Pacific Time to date -


Monday, 26 June 2006
Miserable
Topic: Light and Shadow

Miserable

Hollywood was miserable this date - Monday, June 26, 2006 - dark all day and in the nineties, with the feel of thunderstorms nearby, but they never came - just distant rumbles now and then. The sky turned an odd sick yellow in the late morning and the air was throbbing - time to unplug a few things before the electrical storm. But that passed and the whole basin reverted to a dark and steamy calm. This is not how it's supposed to be out here at the edge of the Mojave, with the mild Pacific just down the road.

This is hard to capture in a photo or two. At LACMA (the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, down on Wilshire) there's a new David Hockney exhibit - portraits this time. The man is famous for his swimming pools. From the LA City Beat review -
The prolific Hockney has by far a more widely disseminated body of work than any current L.A.-identified artist. Ed Ruscha's output, much more subtle and ironic, is a distant second in this regard. Hockney's swimming-pool paintings in sun-bleached pastels (like "A Bigger Splash" and "Pool with Two Figures") have come to define a kind of sequestered gay Southern California privilege. The later long rectangles of various local canyons received wide public display as well. Winding roads and sprawling flora in neo-Fauve colors became emblematic - for better or worse - of a chamber-of-commerce veneer that is, in reality, a precious commodity. Hockney may make sharp observations about L.A., but he's never been one to lacerate the city's most vulnerable foibles.
But if Hockney were to paint a Hollywood Hills pool on a day like this, it would look like this, outside the window here. Printed as a negative, this is how it felt here.

Red pool (negative image)



The sun at six in the evening, obscured by the low steamy clouds -

Sun and palm - through low clouds



Note: These were shot with the medium telephoto lens - AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor, 55-200 mm f/4-5.6G - using a polarizing filter.


Posted by Alan at 7:19 PM PDT | Post Comment | Permalink
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Updated: Monday, 26 June 2006 7:22 PM PDT
Sunday, 25 June 2006
More Blue
Topic: Color Studies

More Blue

The view from the sand at Huntington Beach, Wednesday, June 21, with a sailboat and a gull, and the cool blue waters of the Pacific
If you visit Just Above Sunset, the weekly magazine-format parent to this website, you'll find scads of new photographs there, including amazing shots from our correspondents in Paris and Tel-Aviv. And there are all new high-resolution botanicals, and new architectural shots. That issue was posted mid-afternoon, Pacific Time.

But on this date - Sunday, June 25, 2006 - Hollywood was overcast and muggy. The day was dark and it was in the mid-nineties. It felt more like Tupelo Mississippi, not Los Angeles. Steamy and uncomfortable. So the photo this date is one more blue study, one that didn't make it into the weekly - the view from the sand at Huntington Beach, Wednesday, June 21, with a sailboat and a gull, and the cool blue waters of the Pacific.


Posted by Alan at 9:12 PM PDT | Post Comment | Permalink
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Saturday, 24 June 2006
The Unexpected
Topic: Color Studies

The Unexpected

The banana is an herb, in the genus Musa, which, because of its size and structure, is often mistaken for a tree. It's often mistaken for many things. It's just an odd plant, and in most large gardens in Southern California. Here are some odd views, a specimen in Will Rogers Park on Sunset Boulevard, right in the middle of Beverly Hills.

Banana, Will Rogers Park on Sunset Boulevard, Beverly Hills




Banana, Will Rogers Park on Sunset Boulevard, Beverly Hills


Posted by Alan at 4:00 PM PDT | Post Comment | Permalink
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Friday, 23 June 2006
Studies in Blue...
Topic: Color Studies

Studies in Blue...

From Wednesday, 21 June, 2006 - as seen from the hill at The Korean Bell of Friendship and Bell Pavilion, Angels Gate Park, San Pedro, a gull in flight, and the Pacific below.

Gull in flight, above the Korean Bell of Friendship and Bell Pavilion, Angels Gate Park, San Pedro



View of the Pacific from the Korean Bell of Friendship and Bell Pavilion, Angels Gate Park, San Pedro


Posted by Alan at 7:15 PM PDT | Post Comment | Permalink
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Thursday, 22 June 2006
Folk Art (Transportation Division)
Topic: Oddities

Folk Art (Transportation Division)

A steep hill street, Hancock, in West Hollywood, just south of the Sunset Strip, is full of amazing little craftsman cottages. Photos of those later, but the whole thing is explained here - "The American Craftsman Style or the American Arts and Crafts Movement is an American domestic architectural and interior design style popular from the 1900's to the early 1930's. The style incorporated locally handcrafted wood-, glass-, and metal-work which is both simple and elegant. A reaction to Victorian opulence and the increasingly common mass produced housing elements, the style incorporated aspects of clean lines, sturdy structure, natural materials. The name comes from a popular magazine published in the early 1900's by furniture maker Gustav Stickley called The Craftsman, which featured original house and furniture designs by Harvey Ellis, the Greene brothers, and others. The designs were influenced by the British Arts and Crafts Movement, as well as American Shaker and Mission styles. During this time also emerged the related Prairie School of architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright."

Yeah, well, indigenous folk art is where you find it. This truck was sitting on Hancock in front of one of the cottages being restored, at noon, Wednesday June 21, at noon.

Odd truck door, Hancock Avenue, West Hollywood




Posted by Alan at 7:02 PM PDT | Post Comment | Permalink
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